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IF YOUR RELATIVE WAS ON "LIFE-SUPPORT",

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Kristin Emery Posted: Aug 17, 2011 9:23 PM EDT Updated: Feb 22, 2012 1:57 PM EST 13abc.com Kristin Emery - email Twitter I moved to Toledo in June 2006. One of my first stints on air here at 13abc was on June 21st with eight straight hours of storm and flooding coverage. It certainly helped me to get acquainted with all of our local cities and towns in a hurry! I was born and raised in the Pittsburgh area and my family still lives in Washington, PA. Yes, I'm a diehard Steelers fan and love sports! In fact, I originally wanted to be a sports reporter. I graduated from West Virginia University with a degree in broadcast journalism and somehow wound up doing the weather in Steubenville, Ohio. My boss there, Brian Trauring, is now our news director here at 13abc Action News. I've done just about every job in the newsroom during my career from producing to news reporting and anchoring. But something about doing the weather always intrigued me and made me happy-- whether it's forecasting in the studio or outside reporting on the elements. I've covered hurricanes in Florida, ice storms in North Carolina, flooding in West Virginia, blizzards in Pennsylvania and tornado devastation in Alabama. I went back to school for meteorology and finished my studies at Mississippi State University. I now hold Seals of Approval from both the American Meteorological Society and the National Weather Association. Before coming to 13ABC, I worked in Baltimore for Sinclair Broadcast Group and forecasted weather for stations across the country. In all, I've lived and worked in six states—all east of the Mississippi. You can catch my forecasts and features on the Toledo Zoo, Toledo Museum of Art and Toledo Botanical Garden on 13abc Action News weekend mornings plus my news reports weeknights. In my free time, I love to travel, snow ski and support my Pittsburgh and WVU sports teams. Go Mountaineers!

KDKA-TV, channel 2, is a CBS owned-and-operated television station located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. The station is owned by the CBS Television Stations subsidiary of CBS Corporation, as part of a duopoly with CW station WPCW (channel 19). The two stations share studios located at the Gateway Center in downtown Pittsburgh, KDKA-TV's transmitter located in the Perry North neighborhood of Pittsburgh. KDKA-TV is available on cable television in the Johnstown, Altoona, and Wheeling areas, as well as several other out-of-market cable systems in northwestern Pennsylvania, northwestern Maryland, northeastern Ohio, and North-Central West Virginia. The furthest south KDKA is carried on cable is in Beverly, West Virginia.[1] Contents [hide] 1 Early history 1.1 DuMont origins 1.2 Dealing with competition 1.3 Westinghouse enters 2 Digital television 2.1 Digital channels 2.2 Analog-to-digital conversion 3 Programming 3.1 Syndicated talk shows 3.2 Local shows 3.3 Seasonal 3.4 Former 3.5 Pittsburgh Steelers 4 News operation 4.1 Ratings 4.2 News/Station Presentation 4.3 Newscast Titles 4.4 Station Slogans 4.5 News Music Packages 4.6 On-air staff 4.6.1 Current on-air staff[20] 4.6.2 Notable former on-air staff 5 References 6 External links Early history[edit] DuMont origins[edit] WDTV broadcast of We, the People on April 18, 1952. The guest is New York Yankees player Bill Bevens. The station went on the air on January 11, 1949, as WDTV ("W DuMont TeleVision") on channel 3, it was owned and operated by the DuMont Television Network.[2] It was the 51st television station in the U.S. and the third and last DuMont-owned station to sign on the air, behind WABD (now WNYW) in New York City and WTTG in Washington, D.C. To mark the occasion, a live television special aired that day from 8:30 to 11 p.m. ET on WDTV, which began with a one-hour local program broadcast from Syria Mosque in Pittsburgh. The remainder of the show featured live segments from DuMont, CBS, NBC, and ABC with Arthur Godfrey, Milton Berle, DuMont host Ted Steele, and many other celebrities.[3] The station also represented a milestone in the television industry, providing the first "network" that included Pittsburgh and 13 other cities from Boston to St. Louis.[4] WDTV was one of the last stations to receive a construction permit before the Federal Communications Commission-imposed four-year freeze on new television station licenses. When the release of the FCC's Sixth Report and Order ended the license freeze in 1952, DuMont was forced to give up its channel 3 allocation to alleviate interference with nearby stations broadcasting on the frequency. WDTV moved its facilities to channel 2 on November 23, 1952.[5] Shortly after moving, it was the first station in the country to broadcast 24 hours a day, seven days a week, advertising that its 1:00-7:00 a.m. "Swing Shift Theatre" served the "200,000 workers [in their viewing area] who finish shift work at midnight."[6] DuMont's network of stations on coaxial cable stretched from Boston to St. Louis. These stations were linked together via AT&T's coaxial cable feed with the sign-on of WDTV allowing the network to broadcast live programming to all the stations at the same time. Stations not yet connected to the coaxial cable received kinescope recordings via physical delivery.[citation needed] The DuMont Television Network in 1949. Dealing with competition[edit] Until the end of the freeze, WDTV's only competition came in the form of distant signals from stations in Johnstown, Altoona, Wheeling, West Virginia and Youngstown, Ohio. However, Pittsburgh saw two UHF stations launch during 1953 – ABC affiliate WENS-TV (channel 16, later to become WINP-TV), and WKJF-TV (channel 53, later to become WPGH-TV), an independent station. At the time, UHF stations could not be viewed without the aid of an expensive, set-top converter, and the picture quality was marginal at best with one. UHF stations in the area faced an additional problem because Pittsburgh is located in a somewhat rugged dissected plateau, and the reception of UHF stations is usually poor in such terrain. These factors played a role in the short-lived existences of both WKJF and WENS.[citation needed] Although Pittsburgh was the sixth largest market in the country (behind New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Washington-Baltimore), the other VHF stations in town were slow to develop. This was because the major cities in the Upper Ohio Valley are so close together that they must share the VHF band. After the FCC lifted the license freeze in 1952, it refused to grant any new commercial VHF construction permits to Pittsburgh in order to give the smaller cities in the area a chance to get on the air. WDTV had a de facto monopoly on Pittsburgh television. Like its sister stations WABD and WTTG, it was far stronger than the DuMont network as a whole. According to network general manager Ted Bergmann, WDTV brought in $4 million a year, which was more than enough to keep the network afloat. Owning the only readily viewable station in such a large market gave DuMont considerable leverage in getting its programs cleared in large markets where it did not have an affiliate. As CBS, NBC and ABC had secondary affiliations with WDTV, this was a strong incentive to stations in large markets to clear DuMont's programs or risk losing valuable advertising in the sixth-largest market. Also, NBC affiliates from Johnstown (WJAC-TV) and Wheeling (WTRF-TV, itself now affiliated with CBS) were able to be received in Pittsburgh and a CBS affiliate from Steubenville, Ohio (WSTV-TV, now NBC affiliate WTOV-TV) was also able to be received there as well. CBS, in fact, actually attempted to purchase WSTV-TV's license before it went on the air and move its license to Pittsburgh due to the close proximity between Pittsburgh and Steubenville (At the time less than an hour apart by car; the completion of the Penn-Lincoln Parkway in 1964 reduced that time to about a half hour driving time today.), but the FCC turned CBS down. The Wheeling/Steubenville TV market, despite its very close proximity to Pittsburgh and overlapping signals, remains a separate market by FCC standards today. WDTV aired all DuMont network shows live and "cherry-picked" the best shows from the other networks, airing them on kinescope on an every-other-week basis. WDTV's sign-on was also significant because it was now possible to feed live programs from the East to the Midwest and vice versa. In fact, its second broadcast was the activation of the coaxial cable linking New York City and Chicago. It would be another two years before the West Coast received live programming, but this was the beginning of the modern era of network television.[citation needed] Westinghouse enters[edit] KDKA-TV's studio building at One Gateway Center in Pittsburgh. The station has been housed in this facility since 1956.[7] By 1954, DuMont was in serious financial trouble. Paramount Pictures, which owned a stake in DuMont, vetoed a merger with ABC, who had merged with Paramount's former theater division United Paramount Theaters a year before. A few years earlier, the FCC had ruled that Paramount controlled DuMont and there were still lingering questions about whether UPT had actually broken off from Paramount. Paramount did not want to risk the FCC's wrath. Meanwhile, Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse Electric Corporation had been competing with local politicians to acquire the non-commercial channel 13 license from the FCC, as no other Pittsburgh-allocated VHF station would be signing on for the foreseeable future. After launching WBZ-TV in Boston in 1948 and purchasing two other television stations, Westinghouse was growing impatient with not having a station in its own home market. Westinghouse later offered a compromise plan to the FCC, in which the Commission would grant Westinghouse the channel 13 license; Westinghouse would then "share" the facility with the educational licensee. Finding the terms unacceptable, Pittsburgh attorney Leland Hazard called Westinghouse CEO Gwilym Price to ask him if he should give up on his fight for public television. Price said that Hazard should keep fighting for it, giving Westinghouse backing for the station that would eventually become WQED.[8] Westinghouse then turned its attention to WDTV, offering DuMont a then-record $9.75 million for the station in late 1954. Desperate for cash, DuMont promptly accepted Westinghouse's offer.[9] While the sale gave DuMont a short-term cash infusion, it eliminated DuMont's leverage in getting clearances in other major markets. Within two years, the DuMont network was no more. After the sale closed in January 1955, Westinghouse changed WDTV's call letters to KDKA-TV, after Westinghouse's pioneering radio station KDKA (1020 AM).[10] As such, it became one of the few stations east of the Mississippi River with a "K" call sign. The WDTV calls now reside on a CBS affiliate located 130 miles south of Pittsburgh in Weston, West Virginia, which is unrelated to the current KDKA-TV. That station, which signed on after KDKA-TV adopted its current callsign, adopted those calls "in honor" of KDKA-TV. As KDKA radio had long been an affiliate of the NBC Blue Network (Westinghouse was a co-founder of RCA, NBC's then-parent company), it was expected that KDKA-TV would eventually become a primary affiliate of the NBC television network. But the network was seeking to purchase Westinghouse's Philadelphia stations, KYW radio and WPTZ (now KYW-TV). When Westinghouse balked, NBC threatened to pull its programming from WPTZ and Boston's WBZ-TV unless Westinghouse agreed to trade its Philadelphia properties for NBC's WTAM-AM-FM and WNBK in Cleveland. The decision would lead to an acrimonious relationship between Westinghouse and NBC in later years.[11][12] Two years after the ownership change, channel 2 became a primary affiliate of the higher-rated CBS network instead.[13] KDKA-TV retained secondary affiliations with NBC until WIIC-TV (channel 11, now WPXI) signed on in 1957, and ABC until WTAE-TV (channel 4) signed on in 1958. KDKA-TV became the flagship station of Westinghouse's broadcasting arm, Group W. On November 22, 1963, newscaster Bill Burns provided almost three hours of live coverage after the shooting of President John F. Kennedy.[14] Over the years, channel 2 pre-empted moderate amounts of CBS programming. At one point, from the early 1960s to July 1990, the station did not clear As The World Turns. At the same time, WTAJ-TV in Altoona had run the program and was viewable in the eastern part of the Pittsburgh market. Also, CBS affiliate WTRF-TV in Wheeling, West Virginia was viewable in Pittsburgh and to the west. Until 1978, the show ran on WPGH and for a few years after that, it ran on WPTT-TV (channel 22). KDKA-TV also preempted the daytime game shows and reruns from CBS at various points during the 1970s. KDKA also produced plenty of local programs such as Evening Magazine, Pittsburgh Talks, and local newscasts. The station also occasionally preempted CBS primetime programs for a syndicated movie, local news special, or sports during the years the station had broadcast rights to Pittsburgh Pirates baseball and Pittsburgh Penguins hockey. Weekend pre-emptions included a small portion of Saturday and Sunday morning cartoons, and Sunday morning religious programs. In 1993, KDKA stopped running CBS This Morning and instead ran Disney's syndicated cartoon block. Less than a year later, Westinghouse made a long-term deal with CBS to convert the entire five-station Group W television unit to a group-wide CBS affiliation. Part of this agreement included a deal to stop preempting any CBS shows, except for extended breaking news coverage or local news events beginning in 1995. KDKA-TV continued preempting moderate amounts of programming into 1995. In the fall of 1995, channel 2 began running the entire CBS lineup in pattern, as it, and sister station KPIX-TV in San Francisco, were already affiliated with the network. In early 1996, Westinghouse acquired CBS, making KDKA-TV a CBS owned-and-operated station, after four decades as being simply a CBS affiliate. In 1997, Westinghouse became CBS Corporation, which would then merge with Viacom (which, ironically, has been Paramount's parent since 1994) in 2000, making KDKA a sister station with Pittsburgh UPN affiliate WNPA-TV (channel 19, now CW station WPCW). Five years later, Viacom became CBS Corporation and spun off a new Viacom. In August 2007, KDKA-TV unveiled a new image campaign, entitled Your Home, with music and lyrics performed by singer-songwriter Bill Deasy. The promo features scenes of Pittsburgh and its surrounding areas, as well as three of the station's personalites. In September 2007, the station unveiled another promo featuring the Joe Grushecky song "Coming Home". Later, a third spot, "Long Way Home", was introduced, featuring the voice of Kelsey Friday.[15] Digital television[edit] Digital channels[edit] Channel Video Aspect PSIP Short Name Programming[16] 2.1 1080i 16:9 KDKA 2. Main KDKA-TV programming / CBS Analog-to-digital conversion[edit] KDKA-TV shut down its analog signal, over VHF channel 2, on June 12, 2009, the official date in which full-power television stations in the United States transitioned from analog to digital broadcasts under federal mandate, during that night's broadcast of the Late Show with David Letterman. The station's digital signal remained on its pre-transition UHF channel 25.[17] Before they turned off their analog signal and go to nightlight, they show a clip of what they were om the present to the time WDTV aired. Through the use of PSIP, digital television receivers display the station's virtual channel as its former VHF analog channel 2. In July 2009, the station applied to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to operate two repeater signals: channel 31 in Morgantown, West Virginia and channel 40 in Johnstown.[18] Programming[edit] Syndicated talk shows[edit] As a Westinghouse-owned station, KDKA carried the numerous syndicated talk shows produced by its parent company, including The Merv Griffin Show, The Mike Douglas Show, and Hour Magazine. Later, KDKA carried The Oprah Winfrey Show during its first 9 nationally syndicated seasons (1986-1995), airing the show weekdays at 5 PM. In 1989, KDKA acquired the rights to The Sally Jessy Raphael Show, airing it weekdays at 9 AM and Phil Donahue weekdays at 4 PM, respectively. However, due to the poor ratings of Donahue in the Pittsburgh market, KDKA showed strong interest in new talk shows such as The Ricki Lake Show and The Gordon Elliott Show. Due to KDKA being owned by CBS, the station airs the entire network lineup in order. Sally & Donahue moved to WTAE in 1993, and two years later, KDKA debuted a 5:00 PM newscast, at which point Oprah Winfrey also moved to WTAE, airing at 4:00 PM. In 1997, The Sally Jessy Raphael Show returned to KDKA, and once again was given the 9 AM time slot, where it remained until its cancellation in 2002. Sally was a success in the Pittsburgh area, even beating Montel Williams on WPXI in the 1990s. Local shows[edit] The KDKA-TV newscast logo as seen during its opening.Hometown High-Q (2000–present): airs Saturdays at 11 a.m. - "quiz bowl" format show with three teams composed of local high school students #1 Cochran Sports Showdown (1998–present): airs Sundays at 11:35 p.m. – sports talk show KD/PG Sunday Edition: airs Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - public affairs program The Lynne Hayes-Freeland Show: airs Sundays at 6 a.m. - public affairs program Pittsburgh Today Live: airs weekdays 9:00-10:00 a.m. - Kristine Sorensen and Jon Burnett are the hosts, with Dennis Bowman for weather; local general interest program The Sunday Business Page: airs Sundays at 6:30 a.m. - public affairs program Your Pittsburgh: airs weeknights 7:30-8:00 p.m. - hosted by Kimberly Gill and David Highfield; entertainment program Seasonal[edit] The Children's Hospital Free-Care Fund (1954–present; airs during the holiday season) - yearly pledge drive Hometown Holiday Lights - Series aired during KDKA's newscasts; contest between local families with Christmas displays at their residence. McDonald's Steeler Kickoff (during the NFL season) - Sundays at 11:30 a.m. - Pittsburgh Steelers pre-game show hosted by Bob Pompeani and Edmund Nelson. Steelers Huddle (September 19, 2009–present; airs during the NFL season) - Saturdays at 11:35 p.m. - Bob Pompeani and a rotating member of the Pittsburgh Steelers. Steelers Trivia Challenge (July 16, 2005–present) - Saturdays at 11:35 p.m. - Bob Pompeani hosts a "quiz bowl" format, modeled after Hometown High-Q, with three teams composed of three Pittsburgh Steelers fans who answer team-related trivia questions. The show runs for nine weeks (mid-July to mid-September). Verizon Extra Point (airs during the NFL season) - Pittsburgh Steelers post-game show after CBS broadcasts, hosted by Bob Pompeani and Edmund Nelson. Former[edit] Evening Magazine (August 1, 1977 – October 12, 1990) Giant Eagle High School Sports Advantage The Jerome Bettis Show (September 12, 1998 – February 4, 2006) The Hines Ward Show (September 2, 2006 – January 31, 2009) Mario Lemieux Celebrity Golf Invitational Pittsburgh 2Day (1978–January 19, 1990) Pittsburgh Pirates baseball (1957–1994) Pittsburgh Penguins hockey (1989–1997) Wake Up With Larry Richert (1988–1990) Pittsburgh Steelers[edit] As CBS holds the broadcast contract with the NFL to show games involving AFC teams, KDKA-TV has been the official broadcaster of most Pittsburgh Steelers games since 1998, and serves as the team's flagship station. The team's preseason games that are not nationally televised are also shown on KDKA. KDKA began its relationship with the Steelers in 1962, when CBS first started the leaguewide television package. The Steelers are one of three AFC teams that predate the AFC's basis league, the American Football League, and so KDKA, and not WTAE-TV or WIIC-TV (now WPXI), carried Steelers road games (home games were blacked out locally under all circumstances until 1973, when sold-out home games began to be allowed on local television) – the AFL had television contracts with ABC, and later, NBC. Due to the NFL rules of the time, after the AFL-NFL merger, KDKA did not broadcast any Steelers games from 1970 to 1972. Beginning in 1973, KDKA was allowed to air any Steelers games in which they hosted a team from the National Football Conference, which contained most of the old-line National Football League teams. KDKA also broadcast two Steeler championship wins, Super Bowl X in 1976 and Super Bowl XIV in 1980. Since the Steelers have sold out every home game starting in 1972, no blackouts have been required. In the meantime, from 1970 to 1997, channel 11 aired most Steelers games. When the NFC package moved from CBS to Fox in 1994, WPGH-TV aired the Steelers games that had before aired on KDKA, leaving the senior station without Steelers games for four years. Today, and in general since 1970, the only exceptions to all the above are when the Steelers play at night. Their Monday Night Football games have always aired locally on WTAE, first when ABC had the rights, and since 2006, on ESPN. WTAE also aired simulcasts of their games aired as part of ESPN Sunday Night Football from 1987 to 2005. The NFL requires games on cable channels to be simulcast over-the-air in the markets of the participating teams (again with the home team's broadcast subject to blackout). WTAE has simulcast ESPN-aired games because ESPN is 20% owned by WTAE's owners, Hearst Corporation – their ABC stations have right of first refusal for these simulcasts. Games on TNT and NFL Network have aired on various stations in the area.[citation needed] News operation[edit] [icon] This section requires expansion with: further information on the history of KDKA-TV's news department. (August 2013) KDKA-TV presently broadcasts 34˝ hours of locally produced newscasts each week (with six hours on weekdays, three hours on Saturdays and 1˝ hours on Sundays); KDKA also produces 27 hours of local newscasts each week for CW owned-and-operated sister station WPCW, in the form of an hour-long extension of KDKA's weekday morning newscast at 7 a.m. and a nightly 35-minute newscast at 10 p.m. In 2001, KDKA-TV began producing a 10 p.m. newscast on WNPA (now WPCW); in 2005, it added a two-hour weekday morning newscast from 7-9 a.m. on that station (which was later reduced to one hour from 7-8 a.m.). On June 16, 2009, KDKA-TV began broadcasting its local newscasts in high definition during its noon broadcast, with the introduction of a new set and weather center. Like rival WTAE, only video from in-studio cameras is broadcast in HD while most of the content, including field reports and video footage, are in pillarboxed 4:3 standard definition. On September 1, 2010, KDKA-TV debuted the standardized CBS O&O graphics and music package ("The CBS Enforcer Music Collection" by Gari Media Group). Ratings[edit] As of February 2013, KDKA-TV is the most watched news station in the hours of noon, 4, 5, 6 and 11 p.m. However, WTAE is the most watched news program in the Pittsburgh area in the hours of 5, 6 a.m. WPXI is most watched at the 10 p.m. time slot on WPGH-TV.[19] News/Station Presentation[edit] Newscast Titles[edit] The Esso Reporter (1949-1960s) TV-2 Eyewitness News (1960s-1996) KDKA-TV News (1996–present) Station Slogans[edit] Here's 2 Pittsburgh Renaissance Two (1983) KD and You (1986-1990) The Tri-State News Leader Always Taking the Lead (early 1990s-1996) The Hometown Advantage (1996-2005) Local News First (2005-2007) Your Home (2007-) Expect More (2013-) News Music Packages[edit] From Russia With Love: 007 (John Barry) (19??-19??) Barbarella: The Pill (Bob Crewe, Charles Fox) (19??-19??) WBZ 1970s Telesound Theme (Telesound) (19??-19??) Look For Us (Telesound) (19??-19??) We're 4 (Klein &) (1979-1984) The News Image & The News Image Plus (Tuesday Productions) (1984-1992) Advantage (Gari Media Group) (1992-1997) Signature Theme Package (Jon Gorr Music) (1997-1998) KDKA-TV Prime (SoundByte, Inc.) (1998-2010) The CBS Enforcer Music Collection (Gari Media Group) (2010–present) On-air staff[edit] Current on-air staff[20][edit] AnchorsJennifer Antkowiak - weekday mornings (4:30-7:00 on KDKA and 7:00-8:00 a.m. on WPCW) Rick Dayton - weekday mornings (4:30-7:00 and 7:00-8:00 a.m. on WPCW) Kimberly Gill - weekdays at noon and 4:00 p.m.; also co-host of Your Pittsburgh Susan Koeppen - weeknights at 6:00 and 11:00 p.m.; also consumer reporter Paul Martino - Saturdays at 6:00, Sundays at 6:30 and weekends at 10:00 (WPCW) and 11:00 p.m.; also weekday reporter Trina Orlando - Saturday mornings (6:00-8:00 a.m.); fill-in anchor Ken Rice - weeknights at 5:00, 10:00 (WPCW) and 11:00 p.m. Stacy Smith - weekdays at noon and 4:00 and weeknights at 6:00 p.m.; host of KD/PG Sunday Edition Kristine Sorensen - weeknights at 5:00 p.m.; host of Pittsburgh Today Live (weekday mornings at 9:00 a.m.) Brenda Waters - Saturday mornings (6:00-8:00 a.m.); also reporter Weather teamJeff Verszyla - chief meteorologist; weekdays at 4:00 and weeknights at 5:00, 6:00, 10:00 (WPCW) and 11:00 p.m. Dennis Bowman (AMS and NWA Seals of Approval) - meteorologist; weekday mornings (4:30-7:00 on KDKA and 7:00-8:00 a.m. on WPCW) and weekdays at noon; also co-host of Pittsburgh Today Live (weekday mornings at 9:00 a.m.) Jon Burnett - meteorologist; Saturday mornings (6:00-8:00 a.m.) and Saturdays at 6:00, Sundays at 6:30 and weekends at 10:00 (WPCW) and 11:00 p.m.; also hosts Pittsburgh Today Live (weekday mornings at 9:00 a.m.) Kristin Emery (AMS and NWA Seals of Approval) - fill-in meteorologist Dave Trygar (AMS Seal of Approval) - freelance/fill-in meteorologist Sports teamBob Pompeani - sports director; weekdays at 6:00, 10:35 (The Nightly Sports Call on WPCW) and 11:00 p.m.; also host of KDKA Sunday Sports Showdown Jory Rand - sports anchor; Saturdays at 6:00, Sundays at 6:30 and weekends at 10:35 (The Nightly Sports Call on WPCW) and 11:00 p.m., also sports reporter Mike Zappone - fill-in sports anchor/sports reporter/producer (various times) Reporters Heather Abraham - general assignment reporter Bob Allen - general assignment reporter Sarah Arbogast - traffic/transportation reporter Dave Crawley - "KD Country" reporter Jon Delano - money and politics editor Kym Gable - freelance reporter (also a spokeswoman for Comcast) Marty Griffin - investigative reporter ("KDKA Investigators") Ross Guidotti - general assignment reporter Harold Hayes - general assignment reporter Lynne Hayes-Freeland - general assignment reporter David Highfield - general assignment reporter; also co-host of Your Pittsburgh Ralph Iannotti - general assignment reporter Mary Robb Jackson - general assignment reporter Paul Martino - general assignment reporter Trina Orlando - Westmoreland County bureau chief Andy Sheehan - investigative reporter ("KDKA Investigators") John Shumway - general assignment reporter; also heard on KDKA Radio Dr. Maria Simbra - medical reporter Notable former on-air staff[edit] Susan Barnett - anchor (1999–2003; last at KYW-TV in Philadelphia from 2006 to 2013)[21] Bill Burns - anchor (1953–1989; died in 1997)[22] Patti Burns - anchor/reporter (1974–1997; died in 2001)[23] Don Cannon - anchor/reporter (1999–2008) Bill Currie - sports reporter (1971-1985, died on February 11, 2008) Rehema Ellis - (She began broadcast career at KDKA) Donna Hanover - hosted Evening Magazine (1977–1980, was first her major market television experience; Hanover served as a news anchor in New York; married New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani, both have since divorced)[citation needed] Patrice King Brown - anchor and former Pittsburgh 2Day host (1978–2011; retired on January 28, 2011) Ron Klink - weekend anchor/reporter (1977–1991; was elected as a United States Representative (D-PA), but lost his bid for the U.S. Senate; now running a lobbying firm in Washington, D.C.) Bob Kudzma - weatherman (1968–2002) Jim Lokay - traffic and transportation reporter (2005–2011, now at WCVB-TV in Boston) Vic Miles - weekend anchor/reporter (1966–1971, later worked at WCBS-TV in New York City;[24] died on October 12, 2011) Dennis Miller - contributor and guest host of Evening Magazine (got his first on air experience with KDKA) Paul Moyer - anchor/reporter (1971; later worked at KNBC in Los Angeles) Ron Olsen - reporter/talk show host (1976–1979; later at KTLA in Los Angeles, where he was awarded a Peabody for coverage of the Rodney King beating story; reported internationally on the O.J. Simpson trial for KTLA and Sky TV)[25] Jay Scott - anchor (1976-1978; later anchor at KTTV in Los Angeles) Paul Steigerwald - sports reporter (1987–1998, later the play-by-play announcer for the Penguins on Fox Sports Pittsburgh) Dick Stockton - sports reporter (1967–1971; later play-by-play announcer for NFL on Fox) Brian Sussman - weatherman[when?] Marie Torre - anchor/reporter (1962–1977; died on January 3, 1997) Yvonne Zanos - long-time correspondent from the 1970s whose last position was as KDKA-TV's consumer reporter (died January 12, 2010 at age 60 from ovarian cancer) References[edit] 1.Jump up ^ http://tvlistings.zap2it.com/tvlistings/ZCGrid.do?method=decideFwdForLineup&zipcode=26253&setMyPreference=false&lineupId=WV47645:-&aid=zap2it 2.Jump up ^ "WDTV starts; DuMont outlet debuts in Pittsburgh." Broadcasting - Telecasting, January 17, 1949, pg. 32. [1] 3.Jump up ^ DuMont History website by Clarke Ingram 4.Jump up ^ "Eyewitness: 1949 / TV makes Pittsburgh 'A New Promise'". Post-gazette.com. 2010-05-16. Retrieved 2011-03-29. 5.Jump up ^ "WDTV channel switch." Broadcasting - Telecasting, December 8, 1952, pg. 72. [2] 6.Jump up ^ "We're Making Television History on WDTV," Sponsor, 24 March 1952, 7. 7.Jump up ^ "NRC Convention 08'- Pittsburgh PA". Nrcdxas.org. Retrieved 2011-03-29. 8.Jump up ^ Togyer, Jason. "Pittsburgh Radio & TV Online - Creating 'QED ... at DuMont's expense?". Pbrtv.com. Retrieved 2011-03-29. 9.Jump up ^ "Westinghouse pays record to buy DuMont's WDTV (TV)." Broadcasting - Telecasting, December 6, 1954, pp. 27-28. [3][4] 10.Jump up ^ "WDTV (TV) Pittsburgh changes call to KDKA-TV." Broadcasting - Telecasting, January 31, 1955, pg. 73. [5] 11.Jump up ^ "Philadelphia circle is complete." Broadcasting, Aug. 3, 1964, pg. 23. 12.Jump up ^ "Nine-year history of that trade in Philadelphia." Broadcasting, August 3, 1964, pg. 24-25. 13.Jump up ^ "CBS signs KDKA-TV as basic affiliate." Broadcasting, April 1, 1957, pg. 126. [6] 14.Jump up ^ "Souls who enriched our lives, our region" from Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (December 1, 2002) 15.Jump up ^ "TV Q&A with Rob Owen/KDKA's Image Campaign". post-gazette.com. Retrieved 2007-08-27. 16.Jump up ^ RabbitEars TV Query for KDKA 17.Jump up ^ "DTV Tentative Channel Designations for the First and Second Rounds" (PDF). Retrieved 2012-03-24. 18.Jump up ^ "TV Query Results - Video Division (FCC) USA". Fcc.gov. Retrieved 2011-03-29. 19.Jump up ^ Sciullo, Maria (March 18, 2013). "Ratings race tight for KDKA, WTAE, WPXI news". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 20.Jump up ^ KDKA-TV 2 21.Jump up ^ "Susan Barnett Bio". KYW-TV. Retrieved 9 March 2013. 22.Jump up ^ http://www.apnewsarchive.com/1997/Walter-Spiro-PHILADELPHIA-AP-Walter-Spiro-a-refugee-from/id-5b5a10611e4d7d523b3e278e099af1f5 23.Jump up ^ http://old.post-gazette.com/obituaries/20011101burns1101p2.asp 24.Jump up ^ "Negro Gets TV News Series Show In Pittsburgh." Jet, July 7, 1966. Retrieved 2010-06-01. 25.Jump up ^ "The Peabody Awards | An International Competition for Electronic Media, honoring achievement in Television, Radio, Cable and the Web | Administered by University of Georgia's Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication". Peabody.uga.edu. Retrieved 2011-03-29. External links[edit] Portal icon Pittsburgh portal Portal icon Television portal CBSPittsburgh.com - Official website The early years of Pittsburgh's KDKA-TV Query the FCC's TV station database for KDKA-TV BIAfn's Media Web Database -- Information on KDKA-TV Program Information for KDKA at TitanTV.com Pittsburgh Television history page [show] v· t· e Broadcast television in Southwestern Pennsylvania, Northeastern West Virginia and Far Western Maryland, including Pittsburgh and Morgantown · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · :· · · · :· · :· :· · · · · · · · · · · :· · · · · :· · · [show] v· t· e CBS network affiliates in the state of Pennsylvania · · · · · :· · · · · · · · [show] v· t· e CBS Television Stations (a subsidiary of CBS Corporation) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · (· · ) · (· ) · () [show] v· t· e Owned-and-operated stations of the major television networks of the United States · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 0. 0. [show] v· t· e Major League Baseball on CBS · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Categories: CBS network affiliates Television stations in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania CBS Corporation television stations Channel 25 digital TV stations in the United States Channel 2 virtual TV stations in the United States Television channels and stations established in 1949 Westinghouse Broadcasting DuMont Television Network owned-and-operated stations Major League Baseball over-the-air television broadcasters Pittsburgh Pirates broadcasters Navigation menu Create account Log in Article Talk Read Edit View history Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikimedia Shop Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools Print/export Languages Bahasa Indonesia Edit links This page was last modified on 13 April 2014 at 14:06. 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KDKA may refer to: KDKA (AM), a radio station (1020 AM) licensed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States KDKA-TV, a television station (channel 2) licensed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States KDKA-FM, a radio station (93.7 FM) licensed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States WLTJ, a radio station (92.9 FM) licensed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, which used the call letters KDKA-FM until 1979 3-Deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid kinase, an enzyme Disambiguation icon This disambiguation page lists articles about radio and/or television stations with the same/similar call signs or branding. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. Categories: Broadcast call sign disambiguation pages

KDKA (1020 kHz) is a radio station licensed in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Created by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation on November 2, 1920, it is the world's first commercial radio station, a distinction that has also been challenged by other stations, although it has claimed to be the "world's first commercially licensed radio station". KDKA is currently owned and operated by CBS Radio, with studios located at the combined CBS Radio Pittsburgh facility on Foster Drive in Green Tree and transmitter in Allison Park. Contents [hide] 1 Overview 2 History 2.1 The beginning 2.2 The 1920s 2.3 1930s and '40s 2.4 1950s 2.5 1960s 2.6 1970s 2.7 1980s 2.8 1990s 2.9 2000 and beyond 2.9.1 Nearly sold off 2.10 "90 Years of Serving You" 3 World's First Station claims 4 Programming 5 References 6 External links Overview[edit] KDKA operates on a clear channel and broadcasts a news/talk radio format. News and spoken word programming has been a central feature of its programming from its beginning. The station's 50 kilowatt signal can be heard throughout central and western Pennsylvania, along with portions of Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland, New York, Virginia and Kentucky, and the Canadian province of Ontario during the day. At night, it reaches much of the eastern half of North America. KDKA enjoys grandfathered status as one of six remaining stations east of the Mississippi River that have call letters beginning with K. Three of them are in Pittsburgh, the other two being KDKA-FM (KDKA's sister station) and KQV, as well as KDKA's longtime sister station KYW in Philadelphia (though the KYW callsign has in the past been used in Chicago and Cleveland); KFIZ in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin; and KTGG Spring Arbor, Michigan (though in that instance, it was due to a clerical error at the FCC). History[edit] This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2012) The beginning[edit] "This is KDKA, of the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. We shall now broadcast the election returns." —Leo Rosenburg, on the very first radio broadcast by KDKA, November 2, 1920 KDKA's roots began with the efforts of Westinghouse employee Frank Conrad who operated KDKA's predecessor 75 watt 8XK from the Pittsburgh suburb of Wilkinsburg from 1916. Conrad, who had supervised the manufacturing of military receivers during WWI, broadcast phonograph music and communicated with other amateur radio operators via 8YK. On September 29, 1920, the Joseph Horne department store in Pittsburgh began advertising amateur wireless sets for $10, which could be used to listen to Conrad’s broadcasts.[2] Westinghouse vice president and Conrad’s supervisor, Harry P. Davis, saw the advertisement and recognized the economic potential of radio.[3] Instead of it being limited as a hobby to scientific experimenters, radio could be marketed to a mainstream audience. Consequently, Davis asked Conrad to build a 100-watt transmitter, which would air programming intended to create widespread demand for Westinghouse receivers.[2] The KDKA callsign was assigned sequentially from a list maintained for the use of US-registry maritime stations, and on November 2, 1920, KDKA broadcast the US presidential election returns from a shack on the roof of the K Building of the Westinghouse Electric Company "East Pittsburgh Works" in Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania.[4] There is some indication that the new license had not been received by that date, and the station may have gone on the air with the experimental call sign of 8ZZ that night. The original broadcast was said to be heard as far away as Canada. KDKA continued to broadcast from the Westinghouse building for many months. The 1920s[edit] Soon after its successful election coverage, KDKA upgraded to a 100-watt transmitter. Early programming often featured live musical performances from a Westinghouse band. KDKA provided its first remote broadcast by airing a choir, live, from the Pittsburg Calvary Baptist Church in January 1921.[2] On January 15, 1921, at 8 p.m., KDKA broadcast a speech on European relief by Herbert Hoover from the Duquesne Club in Pittsburgh that was transmitted ten miles down a telephone line to Westinghouse's East Pittsburgh Works and broadcast on 330 meters.[5] On July 2, 1921, the station featured the first national broadcast with live commentary of the Jack Dempsey - Georges Carpentier fight via teletype from New Jersey.[6] Also in 1921 the station had the first broadcasts of major league professional baseball games and the first broadcast college football game. KDKA hosted political comedian Will Rogers in his very first radio appearance in 1922. KDKA played popular music and advertisers began sponsoring special radio programs like The Philco Hour, The Maxwell House Hour and The Wrigley Party. In 1923, KDKA began simulcasting its AM medium-wave broadcasts on shortwave. Along with RCA and General Electric, Westinghouse was a co-founder of NBC in 1926, and thus KDKA was affiliated with the new network. When NBC decided to split its network up into two networks (NBC Red Network and NBC Blue Network), KDKA affiliated with the NBC Blue Network, with WCAE (now WDDZ) and later KQV initially affiliated with the NBC Red Network. Westinghouse would later be forced to divest its 20% ownership stake in NBC in 1932 due to antitrust concerns.[7] 1930s and '40s[edit] In the 1930s, KDKA began the long-running (1932–1980) Uncle Ed Shaughency show. It carried up-to-the-minute coverage of the 1936 St. Patrick's Day flood that submerged downtown Pittsburgh as far as Wood Street. KDKA also played popular big band and jazz music every morning as well as hosting the KDKA Farm Hour. From 1941 to 1959, the Farm Hour was built around farm reports along with music by Slim Bryant and his Wildcats, who eventually became the top local country music act in the Pittsburgh area. Just before the FCC-mandated separation of the Blue Network from NBC, KDKA swapped affiliations with KQV and affiliated with NBC Red.[8] At the same time, it gained a sister station on the then-new FM band in KDKA-FM 92.9. That station would become WPNT in 1979, sold off by Westinghouse in 1984, and is now WLTJ. In 1946, KDKA provided live coverage of the inauguration of David L. Lawrence as Pittsburgh Mayor as well as presidential and governors' inaugurations. By the end of the decade, the musical and comedy team of Buzz Aston and Bill Hinds, billed as "Buzz & Bill", aired. 1950s[edit] In the 1950s, Ed Shaughency was moved from mornings to an afternoon slot, losing his partner, Rainbow (Elmer Walters) in the process. KDKA, impressed with the success Rege Cordic had on WWSW, hired Cordic away. He started his KDKA run on Labor Day, 1954. The Cordic & Company morning show, featuring a team of bright and innovative personalities, gave birth to today's "morning team" radio format, but in an unconventional way. Cordic and his group played a bit of music, but mainly created on-air mayhem in the form of skits, recurring characters such as "Louie The Garbageman" and space alien "Omicron." When Ed Shaughencyy did the news and read a commercial for a local brand of bacon, a sound effect of frying usually ran with it. One day, Cordic substituted a sound effect recording of explosions, and Shaughency barely kept his composure. Cordic's crew included Karl Hardman and Bob Trow, later known for portraying "Bob Dog" on Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. The 1950s saw a shift to local programming at KDKA as national radio shows were moving to television. Art Pallan, also hired away from WWSW, and Bob Tracey became household names on the KDKA airwaves, playing the popular music of the day. For some years, announcer Sterling Yates, also a musician, played hip, progressive jazz on a Sunday morning broadcast. On January 1, 1951, a couple named Ed and Wendy King launched Party Line, the station's first radio talk show. Phone lines were flooded with calls to "Party Line" for its 20-year run, which ended with Ed King's death on November 18, 1971. Unlike most talk shows, callers were not heard but the couple took turns relating what they heard on the line. In 1956, newsman Bill Steinbach, began his 36-year career at KDKA. Within 10 years, Steinbach was anchor of the award-winning 90-to-6, Pittsburgh's popular news program. KDKA gradually embraced rock and roll music with artists such as Bill Haley, the Everly Brothers, Fats Domino, and Elvis Presley, in addition to popular vocalists including Frank Sinatra, Peggy Lee, and Canonsburg, Pennsylvania native Perry Como. However, the station's sound remained much more conservative than most Top 40 stations. KDKA gained a television sister station in the form of KDKA-TV in late 1954, when Westinghouse purchased the then-WDTV from the DuMont Television Network for a then-record $9.75 million.[9] Before the purchase, Westinghouse attempted to purchase the channel 13 license that had been allocated for public broadcasting, but eventually donated the tower to the public interest groups and gave financial backing for the eventual WQED.[10] In a somewhat surprising move (in what would preceded several decades later), KDKA-TV affiliated with CBS instead of NBC like KDKA. KDKA would remain affiliated with NBC Radio until the network purchased WJAS in 1957 in order for WJAS's owners to have a 50% ownership stake in WIIC-TV (now WPXI) with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.[11] KDKA would then go independent, relying more on its Group W ties than a national network. 1960s[edit] By 1960, KDKA leaned more toward rock and roll as competitor KQV made ratings gains. "Your Pal" Pallan played the hit songs and KDKA carried the sounds of screaming crowds as the Beatles arrived in Pittsburgh in 1964. The major exponent of rock on KDKA radio was disc jockey Clark Race, who also hosted "Dance Party" on KDKA-TV, a local version of Dick Clark's American Bandstand. Other artists featured on the station included The Four Seasons, The Vogues, Lou Christie (the latter two Pittsburgh-bred), The Beach Boys, The Hollies, The Supremes, Four Tops, and The Turtles. After 11 years of waking Pittsburghers with laughter, Rege Cordic moved on to new opportunities at KNX in Los Angeles. Pallan and Bob Trow did a two-man show that kept some of the Cordic & Company flavor. "Pallan and Trow, Two For the Show", lasted two and a half years. In April 1968, Jack Bogut moved from Salt Lake City to become the KDKA morning host, a position he held for 15 years. One of Bogut's most memorable contributions to KDKA was his introduction to Western Pennsylvania of the word Farkleberry, which is now a staple of the annual Children's Hospital fund-raising campaign. Other notable personalities included Big Jack Armstrong, Bob Shannon and Terry McGovern, the latter two would go on to enjoy lucrative careers in the Film/TV industry as actors. Also in the 1960s, KDKA was there to cover the highs and lows, from the Pirates' improbable 1960 World Series win, to the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy, Dr. Martin Luther King, and Sen. Robert Kennedy. In local news reporting, the station pioneered with "on the scene" reports of Mike Levine, the peripatetic former newspaper man whose mobile-unit broadcasts from Tri-State-area fires, floods, bank robberies, and coal mine disasters won numerous journalism awards. His nightly "Contact" show (later "Open Mike") was KDKA's initial venture into the news-based talk radio that would become the station's basic format. In the summer of 1969, KDKA debuted overnight talk with Jack Wheeler launching an anything-goes talk show that ran from midnight to 6 a.m. six nights a week. 1970s[edit] By the early 1970s, KDKA moved to more of an adult contemporary sound mixing the rock and roll hits of the 1960s with what is now considered soft rock. Artists such as America, The Carpenters, Doobie Brothers, Paul Simon, Dawn, and Neil Diamond became core artists. The morning show featured less music because of the news and commercial content. In 1973, KDKA found its new direction for the old "Party Line" slot. It was a completely different approach with the bombastic John Cigna moving over from WJAS to anchor the night talk and urge listeners to "buy American!" In 1974 Perry Marshall replaced Wheeler in the overnight slot, which became known as the "Marshall's Office." In 1975, Roy Fox signed on as the 6 to 9 pm talk host. By now, KDKA was considered a full service adult contemporary radio station. In 1979, a newsman Fred Honsberger joined the KDKA team and went on to host a successful evening talk show and a top-rated afternoon drive program. Also in 1979, KDKA covered the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, which was first reported by Harrisburg newsman Mike Pintek. By 1982, Pintek joined the KDKA News staff and later became one of KDKA's most popular talk hosts. He was fired at the end of 2005 in a programming overhaul. In 2007, Pintek became the host of Night Talk on the Pittsburgh Cable News Channel. As of January 2009, Pintek was rehired at KDKA to host a talkshow in the 6pm to 10 pm slot. Pintek then took over the Fred Honsberger shows 12 PM-3 PM slot as of January 2010 following the death of Honsberger in December 2009. 1980s[edit] On July 23, 1982, KDKA claims to have become the world's first radio station to broadcast in AM stereo[12] although experimental AM stereo broadcasts were conducted as early as the 1960s on Mexico's XETRA 690.[13] KDKA's commitment to news and information remained as strong as ever. KDKA kept listeners up-to-the minute on stories such as the 1986 Space Shuttle disaster, the Iran Contra hearings, the deaths of R. Budd Dwyer and Mayor Richard Caliguiri and a large oil spill on the Monongahela river. Through it all, KDKA Radio was the winner of four Joe Snyder awards for outstanding overall news service in Pennsylvania, an honor bestowed by the Associated Press. Throughout the 1980s, KDKA continued an information and news intensive adult contemporary music format, playing four to six songs per hour at drive times and 10 to 12 songs an hour during middays and weekends. At night, the station continued its talk format. 1990s[edit] One of KDKA's biggest changes was in the 1990s. KDKA made the decision to build upon its strengths and switch from a full-service format, which included music, to a news/talk format. The historic moment came on April 10, 1992, when Larry Richert played the last song aired as a regular part of KDKA Radio programming: Don McLean's "American Pie". For many listeners, it was "the day the music died." Rush Limbaugh was added to the noon to 3:00 p.m. slot. All-news blocks were added in the 6:00 to 9:00 a.m. and the 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. slots. KDKA also offered extensive coverage of the 1991 Gulf War and the crash of USAir Flight 427 in September 1994. In 1997, Bob DeWitt was hired as news director, serving for two years. His award-winning team included Bob Kopler, Dave James, Bob Kmetz, Barbara Boylan, Mike Whitely and Beth Trapani. Westinghouse merged with CBS at the start of 1996, so KDKA would soon become an Infinity Broadcasting station, after that chain (a previously separate entity from CBS and Westinghouse) was acquired by Westinghouse. Westinghouse would later turn itself into CBS Corporation in 1997. Viacom bought CBS Corporation in 1999, but five years later transformed itself into CBS Corporation, thus making KDKA now a part of CBS Radio. 2000 and beyond[edit] In September 2001, KDKA offered listeners "wall-to-wall" coverage of the attacks on America and provided the KDKA airwaves to listeners who felt the need to talk about the events. On October 1, 2006, after 52 seasons, KDKA aired its final Pirates game. The Pirates beat the Reds 1-0. On April 26, 2007, the East Pittsburgh building that was the birthplace for KDKA was razed to make way for an industrial complex. Nearly sold off[edit] KDKA Radio's former studios in One Gateway Center in Pittsburgh. The station was housed in this building from 1956 [14] until 2010. It still contains the studios of KDKA-TV today. After the Hearst Corporation sold off the former WTAE radio in 1997 (in effect, splitting the station from WTAE-TV, though the two stations still shared many news-related resources until the radio station became Radio Disney station WDDZ in 2011), KDKA and KDKA-TV became the last remaining heritage TV-radio cluster in the Pittsburgh market, and, until 2010, tied themselves together with both studios located one floor apart from each other in Pittsburgh's Gateway Center. However, on July 31, 2008, CBS Corporation announced that it was going to sell off stations in 12 mid-sized markets so that it could concentrate on larger markets.[15] With Pittsburgh being ranked 24 in Arbitron's national radio rankings (it is, however, ranked 22nd in Nielsen ratings for television), this has led to speculation that CBS may sell off KDKA as well as its three other sister stations (WBZW-FM WZPT-FM, and WDSY-FM); however due to the history of KDKA it is that station that has garnered the most concern. Although CBS has not announced which stations are for sale, CBS has announced on the day of first-round bids (September 22, 2008) that KDKA will not be on the auction block.[16] This was reassured on February 15, 2010, when WBZW-FM switched from a CHR format to a sports radio format and changing its call sign to KDKA-FM, with the sports director from KDKA also running KDKA-FM. "90 Years of Serving You"[edit] On Tuesday, November 2, 2010, KDKA celebrated its 90th anniversary on the air with its special election coverage, exactly the same way that they had every Tuesday, November 2, since its beginning in 1920. The 90th anniversary celebration was primarily sponsored by Westinghouse Electric Company, a nuclear power company which had its roots going back to the original Westinghouse. World's First Station claims[edit] By 1921, the Westinghouse publicity department was asserting that KDKA was the world's first radio station however there are claims by other stations disputing this. However since the call sign "KDKA" was first used in November 1920 all other stations contesting this title have undergone several call sign changes (mostly due to their switch from "experimental" to "commercial") or even have been transferred out of state. No matter which was the first licensed station, KDKA, since its beginning, continues to use its famous tagline: the "Pioneer Broadcasting Station of the World".[17][18] Programming[edit] KDKA is the area's predominant news talk radio station. KDKA's program lineup includes Larry Richert, John Shumway, Marty Griffin, Mike Pintek, Bill Rehkopf, Robert Mangino. The KDKA Morning and Afternoon news shows blend news, information and commentary during the drive time. Griffin, Pintek and Mangino host weekday talk shows. KDKA also has a local Tradio program on weekends (Saturday 4p-6p), one of the largest stations in the country to offer such a service, which is traditionally a staple of small-town radio. Monday - Friday 5:00-9:00 am KDKA Morning News with Larry Richert and John Shumway. News: Paul Rasmussen. Sports: Rob Pratte. 9:00-12:00 pm The Inside Story with Marty Griffin 12:00-3:00 pm The Mike Pintek Show 3:00-7:00 pm KDKA Afternoon News with Bill Rehkopf. News: Rose Ryan-Douglas. 7:00-11:00 pm The Robert Mangino Show 11:00-1:00 am The Jim Bohannon Show 1:00-5:00 am Overnight America with Jon Grayson During the weekend, Dr Knowledge (Overnights Saturday and Sunday with last broadcast December 29, 2013)- also hosts Knowledge in a Minute (to continue 2014 and beyond,[19]) syndicated throughout the country daily Chris Moore (Sundays 4:00 pm – 9:00 pm) References[edit] 1.Jump up ^ United States Callsign Policies, United States Early Radio History. 2.^ Jump up to: a b c Barnouw, Eric (1990). Tube of plenty : the evolution of American television. New York: Oxford University Press. 3.Jump up ^ Finding Aid for the Harry Phillips Davis Collection, 1915-1944, AIS.1964.21, Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh 4.Jump up ^ "Milestones:Westinghouse Radio Station KDKA, 1920". IEEE Global History Network. IEEE. Retrieved 29 July 2011. 5.Jump up ^ Indiana Evening Gazette, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Jan. 14, 1921, pg. 1 6.Jump up ^ Fisher, Marc. Something in the Air. Random House. xiv. ISBN 978-0-375-50907-0. 7.Jump up ^ http://adage.com/article/media/comcast-nbcu-merger-ge-birthed-nbc-1926/140893/ 8.Jump up ^ "KQV, Pittsburgh, and WCBM, Baltimore, Will Transfer to Blue Network in Fall". Broadcasting. March 17, 1941. p. 9. Retrieved December 25, 2010. 9.Jump up ^ "Westinghouse pays record to buy DuMont's WDTV (TV)." Broadcasting - Telecasting, December 6, 1954, pp. 27-28. [1][2] 10.Jump up ^ Togyer, Jason. "Pittsburgh Radio & TV Online - Creating 'QED ... at DuMont's expense?". Pbrtv.com. Retrieved 2011-03-29. 11.Jump up ^ "NBC buys WJAS Pittsburgh." Broadcasting - Telecasting, August 12, 1957, pg. 9. [3] 12.Jump up ^ KDKAradio.com, KDKA Firsts 13.Jump up ^ "Dx listening digest 5-201". World of Radio.com. 2005-11-22. Retrieved 2011-07-21. 14.Jump up ^ "NRC/DXAS Pittsburgh 2008 August 29-31". Retrieved 2011-07-21. 15.Jump up ^ Speculation mounts on KDKA radio sale - PostGazette.com 16.Jump up ^ "First bids on CBS Radio selloffs due today". Radio-Info.com. September 22, 2008. Retrieved May 27, 2011. 17.Jump up ^ "Kdka".[dead link] 18.Jump up ^ "KDKA History". KDKA. Retrieved 2011-07-21. 19.Jump up ^ http://www.post-gazette.com/ae/tv-radio/2013/12/20/KDKA-AM-trims-staff-newscasts/stories/2013122001050000000> Melhuish, Martin. (1996). Oh What a Feeling: A Vital History of Canadian Music. Kingston, ON, Quarry Press. Portal icon Pittsburgh portal Portal icon Radio portal External links[edit] Official website FCC History Cards for KDKA KDKA on Twitter Listen live Query the FCC's AM station database for KDKA Radio-Locator Information on KDKA Query Nielsen Audio's AM station database for KDKA Google Inc. "Satellite View of KDKA (AM)'s Transmit Facility and Tower". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. Retrieved 2011-07-21. Finding Aid for the Harry Phillips Davis Collection, 1915-1944, AIS.1964.21, Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh "Remarks at Eureka College in Eureka, Illinois". Retrieved 2011-07-21. Signal reaches Palm Beach County [show] v· t· e Radio stations in the Pittsburgh market · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · :· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · :· · · · · · · · · · (· · ) : [show] v· t· e News/Talk Radio Stations in the state of Pennsylvania · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · :· · · · · · · · · · · · [show] v· t· e Pittsburgh · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Symbol book class2.svg· Portal-puzzle.svg· Folder Hexagonal Icon.svg [show] v· t· e CBS Radio · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · : [show] v· t· e CBS Corporation · · · · · · · · · · (· ) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · (· · ) · (· ) · () · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · [show] v· t· e Clear-channel stations · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · : [show] v· t· e Major League Baseball on Westinghouse · · · · · · · · · · · [show] v· t· e All-News Radio Stations in the United States · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Categories: HD Radio stations CBS Radio stations Radio stations in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Westinghouse Broadcasting All news radio stations in the United States Radio stations established in 1920 History of radio Navigation menu Create account Log in Article Talk Read Edit View history Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikimedia Shop Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools Print/export Languages Deutsch Espańol Srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски Edit links This page was last modified on 2 May 2014 at 01:22. 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For the previous station that held the KDKA-FM callsign, see WLTJ. KDKA-FM KDKA-FM logo City of license Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Broadcast area Pittsburgh metropolitan area Branding SportsRadio 93.7 The Fan Slogan All Sports. All The Time. Frequency 93.7 MHz First air date 1953 Format 93.7 HD-1: Sports talk 93.7 HD-2: KDKA simulcast 93.7 HD-3: CBS Sports Radio ERP 41,000 watts HAAT 167 meters Class B Facility ID 20350 Callsign meaning taken from sister station KDKA Former callsigns WKJF-FM (1950s-?) WKOI (?-?) WJOI (?-1981) WBZZ (12/10/1981-07/07/2004) WRKZ (07/07/2004-04/02/2007) WTZN-FM (04/02/2007-11/27/2007) WBZW-FM (11/27/2007-02/15/2010) Affiliations CBS Sports Radio Owner CBS Radio (CBS Radio Stations Inc.) Sister stations KDKA, KDKA-TV, WBZZ, WDSY-FM, WPCW Webcast Listen Live Website www.937thefan.com KDKA-FM (93.7 FM), branded as "SportsRadio 93.7 The Fan", is a radio station in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Owned by CBS Radio, the station operates at 93.7 MHz with an ERP of 41 kW. Its transmitter is located in Pittsburgh. The station programs a sports radio format. It simulcasts its AM namesake, KDKA on its HD2 subchannel, while HD3 is the national broadcast feed of CBS Sports Radio. Contents [hide] 1 History 1.1 The first "B94" years 1.2 The "K-Rock" years and "The Zone" experiment 1.3 The return of B94 1.4 Sportsradio 93.7 The Fan 2 References 3 External links History[edit] The 93.7 frequency in Pittsburgh began its life as WKJF-FM in the 1950s, an independently-owned FM station. For a brief time, there was a co-owned UHF TV station, WKJF-TV (channel 53; now occupied by WPGH-TV), which operated in 1953-54. During its early incarnations as WKJF, WKOI, and WJOI, the station programmed a beautiful music format. The first "B94" years[edit] Debuting on Monday April 6, 1981, WBZZ (B94) was the city’s number one Top 40 music station, tailoring its programming to not only a younger audience, but also a Pittsburgh audience. The first song played after the format switch was " You May Be Right" by Billy Joel. B94 featured local morning shows such as “Quinn and Banana" (featuring Jim Quinn and "Banana" Don Jefferson) from its debut in 1983 until 1993, and “John, Dave, Bubba, Shelly” (with some minor personality changes) from 1993 through 2004. In 2000, Clear Channel Communications unveiled a new CHR format, KISS-FM, on WKST-FM. The new station began to take a large chunk out of B94's audience. With more syndicated programming featuring famous national on air talent and focusing more on the younger audience, B94, for the first time, saw itself slipping into second place. Also not helping matters was sister station WZPT switching to a Hot AC format at the same time, which, while it played a mix of 1980s and 1990s music with current hits, otherwise had a similar format to B94. In February 2003, WBZZ tweaked its name by calling itself “93-7 BZZ”. This was done because the station didn't want any confusion of exactly where it was on the radio dial, especially considering that the only station in Pittsburgh actually on the 94 range (WWSW-FM) had an oldies format. It was also done to re-image the station to compete with WKST, and because most radio stations sound out their exact frequency rather than rounding it due to the spread of digital tuners. Later, in mid-2004, the station tweaked its name again, calling itself "B93-7". The "K-Rock" years and "The Zone" experiment[edit] In 2004, Clear Channel yanked Howard Stern from all of their owned stations that aired his show, including the local WXDX-FM. In response, WBZZ operations manager Keith Clark decided to flip the station’s format after 23 years, and not only pick up Howard Stern (which he saw as a golden opportunity to improve the station's ratings), but unveil a new active rock format known as "93-7 K-Rock" to compete with Clear Channel’s other rock stations. On June 30, 2004, at 8 a.m., without much warning, WBZZ’s on-air talent gathered to say goodbye to Pittsburgh, thanking the city for its support throughout the years. WBZZ ended the Top 40 format at 8:30 a.m. with "Move This" by Technotronic, while K-Rock's first song was "For Those About To Rock" by AC/DC. Listeners that had liked WBZZ but didn't like the new rock format were encouraged on-air to listen to sister station WZPT. The WBZZ call letters would be replaced by WRKZ on July 7, 2004. Ratings for the station improved initially after the switch, but began to decline before Howard Stern's departure for Sirius Satellite Radio. To replace Stern, the station carried David Lee Roth's radio show as his replacement. However, due to low ratings, Roth was replaced by Opie and Anthony less than three months after his debut. The afternoon drive show of Kidd Chris, from co-owned WYSP in Philadelphia, aired on 93.7 from August 28, 2006 until March 19, 2007. On April 2, 2007, K-Rock became "93.7 The Zone," and changed its call signs to WTZN-FM in the process. This left Pittsburgh without an active rock station until WKVE flipped to it in 2009. The new station, although not carrying the "Free FM" name in its branding, was considered to be part of CBS's hot talk network by that name, the only station to affiliate with the network after the initial launch. Joining the lineup were Opie and Anthony, Pittsburgh native Dennis Miller, and former WDVE personality Scott Paulsen.[1] The station also carried programming from Sporting News Radio. Miller and Paulsen were displaced to KDKA when the format was abandoned. The return of B94[edit] Logo for the revival of B94, used from October 2007 to February 2010 On Monday, October 1, 2007, at 10 AM, after Opie and Anthony, WTZN began stunting with Christmas music, in anticipation of a format flip scheduled for later that week.[2] The station made some fairly obvious hints as to the future of the station, advertising "Something's missing in 'Pitts-urgh'," and asking, "What is missing in Pitts-urgh?", prompting visitors to go to a message board at http://www.pitts-urgh.com/ where there is a message board asking "What do you miss the most about Pittsburgh?," among the choices being "B94 Radio." B94 returned to Pittsburgh the following Friday, October 5, at 5 pm, with its first song being Justin Timberlake's "SexyBack." This marked CBS Radio's first top 40 station launch of the late 2000s; it would later launch the format in Houston (KKHH), San Francisco (KMVQ-FM), New York City (WXRK), Los Angeles (KAMP-FM), and Detroit (WVMV). The return of B94 was apparently part of a CBS Radio initiative of resurrecting radio stations that had been killed off for other formats, such as WCBS-FM in New York and KFRC-FM in San Francisco. However, unlike those stations, which carry classic hits formats, B94 played current hits. On November 27, 2007, WTZN switched its call sign to WBZW-FM to reflect its new format. B94's former call letters, WBZZ, were in use by an Adult Contemporary radio station in Malta, New York. That station is now known as WQSH, and CBS has indicated an intention to reacquire the call signs for use on one of its properties (which would later be at WZPT). In the wake of WAMO-FM's departure from the Urban Contemporary format in September 2009 after it was sold to a Catholic-based organization, WBZW have managed to take advantage of the situation by adding current R&B/Hip-Hop tracks to pick up the displaced WAMO listeners, even at the expense of the more Rhythmic-heavy WKST, but at the same time stay within the Mainstream Top 40/CHR realm due to WKST's Rhythmic direction. Sportsradio 93.7 The Fan[edit] On January 19, 2010, it was announced that CBS Radio would drop B94 for sports talk, launching February 15, 2010 under the name "Sportsradio 93.7 The Fan".[3] Again, the change was part of an initiative by CBS to establish FM sports talk stations; often displacing heritage music stations in the process (WBZ-FM in Boston was another example of this). The station will focus on local sports programming while going head-to-head with WEAE and WBGG, which are owned by ESPN Radio and affiliated with Fox Sports Radio, respectively. Much like the previous abandonment of B94, the station's format was merged into WZPT ("Star 100.7"). Bubba and Melanie from the former B94 morning show have both moved to Star 100.7, with Bubba joining JR and Shelly on the morning show and Melanie Taylor taking the midday shift. Former WZPT midday jock Scott Alexander slides to afternoons, prompting the exit of former Star afternoon personality Jonny Hartwell. Kobe, B94's afternoon jock and Music Director, and Flick, B94's night jock, were both released. Flick eventually wound up at WKST. Midday guy Sean "Coop" Cooper was transferred to nights at WYCD in Detroit.[4] The end of B94 came in the late hours of the 14th, when 93.7 began stunting with music played at sports events, also known as "jock jams", and liners redirecting listeners of B94 to Star 100.7, before the flip officially occurred at 5 AM on the 15th. Many of the liners are also used (with a different branding) on sister stations WSCR "670 The Score" in Chicago, WKRK-FM "92.3 The Fan" in Cleveland, and WFAN/WFAN-FM "AM 66/FM 101.9 WFAN" in New York. The station also adopted the call sign KDKA-FM on February 15, 2010, to reflect the recent trend for CBS Radio all-sports stations in markets with a heritage CBS-owned station to have matching call signs, in this case KDKA-TV and the historic0 KDKA Radio. As with both the new format and when it was WTZN-FM, the only other FM talk station in Pittsburgh is WPGB. Portal icon Pittsburgh portal Portal icon Radio portal References[edit] 1.Jump up ^ [1], 2.Jump up ^ Radio station 93.7 dumps talk format after six months 3.Jump up ^ http://www.wpxi.com/news/22273461/detail.html 4.Jump up ^ http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10020/1029443-67.stm External links[edit] Official website Query the FCC's FM station database for KDKA Radio-Locator information on KDKA Query Nielsen Audio's FM station database for KDKA Pittsburgh Tribune-Review article Paulsen's Departure from WDVE Article on B94's return from Edison Media Research (October 10, 2007) [show] v· t· e Radio stations in the Pittsburgh market · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · :· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · :· · · · · · · · · · (· · ) : [show] v· t· e Sports Radio Stations in the state of Pennsylvania · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · :· · · · · · · · · · · · :· · · [show] v· t· e Fox Sports Radio stations in the United States · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · : :· · · · · :· · · · · · · · · :· · [show] v· t· e CBS Corporation · · · · · · · · · · (· ) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · (· · ) · (· ) · () · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · [show] v· t· e CBS Radio · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · : [show] v· t· e Pittsburgh Pirates · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · :· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · :· · · · · :· · · · · · · :· · · · · · · · · · · :· :· :· · · :· · · · · · · :· :· · · · · · · · :· · · · · · · · · :· : (· · ) · (· · ) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Coordinates: 40.4412°N 80.0253°W Categories: CBS Radio stations Radio stations in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Sports radio stations in the United States Radio stations established in 1953 CBS Sports Radio stations Navigation menu Create account Log in Article Talk Read Edit View history Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikimedia Shop Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools Print/export Languages Edit links This page was last modified on 18 April 2014 at 02:21. 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Meet The Team Return to Bio Index Kristin Emery Kristin Emery Twitter Talk about a rousing welcome to Toledo: One of my first days on the air here at 13ABC doing the weather was June 21, 2006. That night, we were deluged with rain, lightning and tornado warnings and were on the air for 7 hours without a break! It certainly helped me to get acquainted with all of our local cities and towns. I was born and raised in the Pittsburgh area and my family still lives in Washington, PA. Yes, I'm a diehard Steelers fan and love sports! In fact, I originally wanted to be a sports reporter. I graduated from West Virginia University with a degree in broadcast journalism and somehow wound up doing the weather in Steubenville, Ohio. My boss there, Brian Trauring, is now our news director here at 13abc Action News! I've done just about every job in the newsroom during my career from producing to news reporting and anchoring. But something about doing the weather always intrigued me and made me happy-- whether it's forecasting in the studio or outside reporting on the elements. I've covered hurricanes in Florida, ice storms in North Carolina, flooding in West Virginia and blizzards in Pennsylvania. I decided to go back to school for meteorology and finished my studies at Mississippi State University. I now hold Seals of Approval from both the American Meteorological Society and the National Weather Association. Before coming to 13ABC, I worked in Baltimore for Sinclair Broadcast Group and forecasted weather for stations across the country. You can catch my forecasts on 13ABC Action News weekend evenings and when I fill in for other Storm Team meteorologists. And you can email me at kristin.emery@13abc.com. In my free time, I love to travel, snow ski, play golf and support my Pittsburgh and WVU sports teams. Go Mountaineers!